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THORNTON'S FATHER, AMOS PARKER WILDER, AND HIS UNCLE, JULIAN WILDER (YOUNGER), ABOUT 1867. PICTURE TAKEN IN CALAIS, MAINE, WHERE AMOS PARKER WAS BORN.

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ISABELLA THORNTON NIVEN WILDER, CIRCA 1921

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THORNTON WILDER (CENTER) IN BLUE HILL FALLS, MAINE WITH WILDER RELATIVES, CIRCA 1952

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ISABEL, AMOS NIVEN, CATHARINE AND THORNTON WILDER AT YALE, JUNE, 1956, WHEN AMOS RECEIVED AN HONORARY DEGREE FROM HIS ALMA MATER

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AMOS, THORNTON AND ISABEL WILDER, ALUMNI DAY, YALE, JUNE 1970

The Wilder Family

Thornton Wilder’s family was filled with successful, highly educated and accomplished people. His father, Amos Parker Wilder (1862-1936), was editor and part owner of the Wisconsin State Journal and the United States Consul General to Hong Kong and Shanghai. His mother, Isabella Thornton Niven Wilder (1873-1946), was a cultured, educated woman who instilled a love of literature, drama and languages in her children, and who wrote vivid poetry. Thornton’s older brother, Amos Niven Wilder, was a highly acclaimed professor of New Testament scholarship, an insightful essayist, and a distinguished poet, as well as a tennis champion. Thornton’s sister Charlotte was a professor of English and an award-winning poet. Sister Isabel was the author of three popular novels, a graduate of Yale School of Drama and the curator of Yale University’s theater archive. Thornton’s youngest sister, Janet Wilder Dakin, was a professor of biology, an author, and a noted environmentalist. Indeed, the Wilder family made its mark across generations and in many different fields.

Visit the MEDIA ARCHIVE for more photos of the Wilder Family.

Amos Niven Wilder (1895-1993), Brother

Thornton’s older brother Amos Niven Wilder (1895-1993) received his B.A., B.D., and Ph.D. from Yale and also studied at Oxford, the University of Brussels, and several other schools in Europe. During World War I, he served with the American Field Service (AFS) in France and Macedonia and as a corporal of artillery with the American Expeditionary Forces. He was ordained a Congregational American minister in 1926. Following a pastorate for several years in North Conway, New Hampshire, he went on to a teaching and scholarly career at Hamilton College, Andover Newton Theological School, Chicago Theological School, the University of Chicago, and finally Harvard Divinity School, where he became Hollis Professor of Divinity. Amos Wilder was also a prize-winning poet, literary critic, and nationally-ranked tennis player. At the time of his death, he was the oldest living man who had played on center court at Wimbledon. He married Catharine Kerlin in 1935. They had two children, Catharine Dix and Amos Tappan.

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Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), Sister

From the Thornton Wilder Society Website

 

Thornton Wilder’s oldest sister Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980) was a poet who shared the Shelley Memorial Award for Poetry in 1937 with Ben Belitt. She attended high schools in Berkeley, California, and in China, and graduated from Berkeley High School. She received an M.A. degree from Radcliffe, and went on to a teaching career at Wheaton College and Smith College. In 1934, Charlotte moved to New York to devote all her time to writing. In 1941, she suffered a severe nervous breakdown. With the exception of periods in the early 1950s, she remained in institutions the rest of her life.

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Isabel Wilder (1900 – 1995), Sister

From the Thornton Wilder Society Website

 

Thornton’s sister Isabel Wilder (1900-1995) attended some thirteen schools by the time she was twenty. As a result she never attended college. She was, however, a member of the first graduating class of the Yale School of Drama (1928) and wrote three successful novels in the 1930s. She never married. Of all the Wilder family members, Isabel was closest to Thornton, remaining his personal agent, spokesperson, hostess and representative in this country and abroad. After 1930, Isabel made her permanent residence with her parents and, following their deaths, with her brother Thornton in the family home in Hamden, Connecticut.

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Janet Wilder Dakin (1910-1994), Sister

From the Thornton Wilder Society Website

 

Thornton Wilder’s youngest sister, Janet Wilder (1910-1994), was the only Wilder child born in Berkeley, California. She attended schools in Berkeley and Oxford, England, and was graduated from New Haven High School in Connecticut. She then went to Mount Holyoke College, where she earned her B.A. degree in 1933, magna cum laude; she was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She earned an M.A. in biology in 1935, and completed a Ph.D. in zoology at the University of Chicago in 1939. She then returned to Mount Holyoke to teach.

 

In 1941, Janet Wilder married Winthrop Saltonstall (Toby) Dakin, an attorney and civic leader, and they lived in Amherst, Massachusetts. They had no children, and Janet devoted her energy to conservation issues, equestrians affairs, and animal rights. She wrote a book about raising a Morgan horse. At her death in 1994, she was remembered as “The First Lady of Amherst.”

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Chronology of Amos N. Wilder’s World War I Service

26 September

Enlists in New York as volunteer ambulance driver

21 October

Sails for France

6 November

Begins three-month assignment, American Ambulance Hospital in Paris (“the Paris Service”)

31 January

Transfers to American Field Service (AFS)

7 February

Begins three-month assignment, AFS Section 2, at the front in the Argonne, west of Verdun

6 April

United States enters war against Germany

16 May

Begins seven-day leave in London and the Lake District

7 July

Following reenlistment in AFS, departs Paris for Macedonia and service with the Army of the Orient

3 August

Begins assignment with AFS Section 3, attached to Second Serbian Division, encamped at Bistrika, Serbian Front

19 October

Departs Salonika for Paris from AFS in Paris

15 November

Released from AFS in Paris

26 November

Enlists in Paris as private in U.S. Army, assigned to Field Artillery Training School, Valdahon

2 January

Reassigned at Valdahon to A Battery, Seventeenth Field Artillery, Second Division; promoted to corporal

8 March

Departs Valdahon for the front, Rupt Sector, southeast of Verdun

1 June

Division rushed to Chateau-Thierry/Belleau Wood defense to repel massive German thrust toward the Marne and Paris

7-8 July

Regiment placed in reserve during Second Battle of the Marne

15 July

Begins forced march for Soissons/Viller-Cotterets mobilization and decisive attack of 18 July

29 July

Division rusticated near Nancy

Sept. –October

Hospitalization, convalescent camps, influenza quarantine in southwest France

12-13 Sept

American-led victory at St.-Mihiel

20 October

Returns to A Battery behind the front at Blanc Mont Ridge

31 October

Moves to the front in Argonne Forest for attack of 1-2 November

8 November

Foch gives terms with 72-hour armistice for German answer

11 November

Armistice officially declared

28 June

  • Discharged from the U.S. Army at Gievres
  • Discharge Depot after duties at Bendorf and Coblenz with the Army of Occupation and release for studies at University of Toulouse

September

Begins senior year at Yale